The Trunk on the Loft

"Deyr fé,
deyja frændr,
deyr sjálfr it sama,
en orðstírr
deyr aldregi,
hveim er sér góðan getr"
oldrags:


Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum


The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

oldrags:

Robe, 1795-1800 England, the Victoria & Albert Museum

The cotton weaving and printing industries in Britain expanded greatly during the period 1775-1800. Cotton was a very popular fabric for clothing, from sheer muslins to heavy corduroys. It was part of the wardrobe of all classes. This printed cotton gown of the late 1790s could have been the Sunday best of a working-class woman or the informal morning gown of a wealthy lady. The very high waist and long sleeves are the typical fashion of this period.

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(via whenasinsilks)

miss-milktea:

V&A Collection: ball gown, UK ca. 1820, silk satin and silk net embroidered with metal and trimmed with silk blonde bobbin lace, hand sewn

omgthatdress:

dress ca. 1818 via The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

omgthatdress:

dress ca. 1818 via The Los Angeles County Museum of Art

oldrags:


Robe à la française, ca 1760 England, KCI
Chinese-inspired (chinoiserie) arts were popular in the 17th-18th centuries as traders brought back exotic goods from the far east.  In fashion and textiles, this is usually manifested through prints or construction.  Here, it comes in the form of color.  Yellow in traditional Chinese culture belonged to the ruling family alone and could not be used in any way by anyone belonging to a lower rank of society.  The emperor was even known as Huangdi (“Yellow Emperor”).  This knowledge led to a surge in popularity of the color in Europe.

oldrags:

Robe à la française, ca 1760 England, KCI

Chinese-inspired (chinoiserie) arts were popular in the 17th-18th centuries as traders brought back exotic goods from the far east.  In fashion and textiles, this is usually manifested through prints or construction.  Here, it comes in the form of color.  Yellow in traditional Chinese culture belonged to the ruling family alone and could not be used in any way by anyone belonging to a lower rank of society.  The emperor was even known as Huangdi (“Yellow Emperor”).  This knowledge led to a surge in popularity of the color in Europe.

(via whenasinsilks)